Photography Travel Packing List

Photography Travel Packing List

Checklists are lifesavers. Checking a list can make sure you don’t arrive in Belize with a perfectly good camera and tripod — but no tripod quick release plate.

The 24Moves Photography Travel Packing List

About once a year, I update my photography checklist just before taking a photography trip. This year, I added a few additional checklist boxes to help make sure I remember some important details. For example:

  • CLEAN – a reminder to wipe memory cards and clean lenses
  • TEST – to make sure I’m not packing any heavy gear that is impossible to use
  • FULL BATTERY – its important to pack batteries, but charging them is pretty key too
  • CHARGER – once the battery is charged, pack the charger
  • BAGGAGE – a reminder of which items I can “check” and which I should “carry on”.

It’s not just a checklist!

The checklist also has room for your equipment serial numbers. Once you are all packed and ready to go, you can include the checklist with your important documents. If anything is lost or stolen, you have a ready-made inventory — including identifying digits — to provide authorities and/or your insurance company! You won’t have to wait until you get home to find serial numbers before calling to file a police report.

Bonus! It’s free!

Just like every year, I’m happy to make my check list available for friends, family and HoustonPhotowalks.com Members — anyone that can use it! So print it out and get to cleaning, charging and packing!

If you find this useful, post a comment to say hello and let me know!!

Bon Voyage!

Download the Packing Worksheet

Joe Lippeatt is a User Experience Engineer, Front End Specialist and Application Developer for 24Moves Consulting. He is also the organizer of HoustonPhotowalks.com Photography Club. When not working, he’s enjoying planning photography trips and helping his wife and son work in their gardens.

Using an iPhone / iPad for Document Storage

Using an iPhone / iPad for Document Storage

The iBooks App

Many folks know that their iPhone and iPad can read books using the iBook App from the App Store. Its free and very simple to install. What many folks don’t know is, it can be used to store things other than just ebooks.

My iPad is full of PDFs I’ve pulled from the web, mostly application development ebooks and camera gear manuals. A simple google search can find you a manual for just about any device or software on the market.

Installing iBooks

iBooks is a very simple install. Open the App Store and search, its that easy. Its free and works on both iPhone and iPad.

Adding PDF Files from the Web

While in Safari, locate a PDF file you want to save and view it. Usually this is after searching on google and it taking you to a page with a link.

While the PDF is open on your device, click at the very top of the screen, just below the URL and Search bar (see screenshot right).

After tapping in that area, you will get a dark menu bar, with an option for Send To, click that option.

Next you will be asked where to send the PDF document, select iBooks. iBooks will open and the document will be saved to the PDF collection (you can move it later).

Adding PDF Files from Email

If you have a PDF on your desktop, or one that someone has sent you, you can send it directly to iBooks from the Mail app. This works exactly the same way as saving from the web, however your PDF may not automatically download when you retrieve your files. It helps to have a fast internet connection (wifi).

Tap the PDF attachment in your email, it will either open, or start downloading and then open. After the PDF opens, look for the Send To icon at the top right side of the screen; the icon is a little box with an arrow. Tap that icon and select “Open in iBooks”.

Adding Content that is not already PDF Files

This can be tricky, or simple, depending on your set up. If yo have a Mac, saving a file to PDF is really simple. You save the content (Text file, Image, etc) to PDF using the Print function. Then as described above, email the file to yourself and open it on your phone.

You can “screen shot” content on your phone and convert that to PDF as well. For example, if you are on Google maps, screenshot the area you want to keep (but not keep searching for). Then edit that file with any one of several PDF conversion utilities.

Then you can import that directly into iBooks as a PDF

Arranging Documents in iBooks

Once your PDFs are in the iBooks PDFs collection, you can move them around, including creating Custom Collections. In this example, I’m saving all of my travel, shoot info and some maps for my photography trip to Alaska.

In the end, I have all of my documents and maps in an easy to access location, and can even share the Collection with my iPad via wifi for a larger view or share with others.